Sword Art Online: Hollow Realization Review

Let me say upfront that I am a big fan of Sword Art Online. While others may enjoy trashing the series for the directions it goes at times, I fell in love with the high stakes drama it presented for viewers. While .hack had some characters falling into comas if they encountered a certain person, Sword Art Online had thousands of people locked into an MMORPG, fighting for their very existence.

.hack//Sign came close with a main character who is unable to log off, but when people in SAO died in the game, they died in real life. To me, this is an amazing concept that had me hooked from the beginning. My love may have tapered off a little with Sword Art Online II, but I am always eager for something to renew my enjoyment.

But even though Sword Art Online takes place inside an MMORPG, this experience hasn’t transitioned well to video games. Hollow Fragment had a huge translation problem, while Lost Song fell into a hole of mediocrity. Does Sword Art Online: Hollow Realization have what it takes to set it apart from its disappointing brethren? Yes and no. Continue reading

Superdimension Neptune VS Sega Hard Girls Review

Much like MegaTagmension Blanc + Noire, Superdimension Neptune VS Sega Hard Girls is set in an alternate history from the rest of the series. The cast is present, but the characters don’t know one another. They take on different roles as the game sees fit. In this case, IF is still her adventurous self on the lookout for knowledge.

Things start off in a pretty rough spot. Gameindustri has transformed into a post-apocalyptic wasteland. While it isn’t immediately explained how exactly that happened, it is clear a war has destroyed the once beautiful scenery. While searching for an ancient library said to contain every piece of the world’s history, she sees what first appears to be a shooting star but is in fact a person falling from the sky (sound familiar?).  Continue reading

God Eater 2: Rage Burst Review

God Eater 2 traveled a similar trajectory that its prequel followed. It started as a game for the PlayStation Portable, received an enhanced release (this time ported to the PlayStation Vita), before finally making its way to the console. While fans in the West received the superior version of the original release with Gods Eater Burst, they were left grasping for air when every form of God Eater 2 came and went in Japan years ago.

In a single season, Bandai Namco has seen fit to release both God Eater Resurrection and God Eater 2: Rage Burst on the Western shores. In my review, I said Resurrection held plenty of content for the low financial entry it commands. But does the sequel justify its full price tag? Continue reading

God Eater Resurrection Review

It seems like it’s been ages since God Eater showed its face on our side of the ocean. Previously released as Gods Eater Burst on the PlayStation Portable, the series is billed as Bandai Namco’s attempt at cashing in on the Monster Hunter craze. The developers focused on delivering an interesting cast of characters built around a story of a world creeping towards the edge of annihilation.

God Eater’s core problem boiled down to the timing of its release; it came out too late in the west to make an impact. Sony’s PSP was already reaching the end of its profitability in the west. Sales had tanked, marketing was nonexistent, and people had already moved on.

It was a different story in Japan. The franchise continued to grow thanks to a loyal base who were (and still are) far more interested in games that complimented a growing mobile lifestyle. They were treated to a sequel, an expansion, and even an anime. Continue reading